Where Do Juveniles Go After They Are Involved in Offensive Incidents Where They Can No Longer Remain in School?

Archie Lee Boone Jr.

http://www.hollainc.net

11/22/2021

…black students represented 23 percent of Virginia’s total student enrollment, they accounted for 53 percent of short-term suspensions, 60 percent of long-term suspensions, and 52 percent of expulsions…

We all know that our juvenile justice system is heavy ladened with challenges by the issue of racial and ethnic disparities. Particularly, in the disparate and disproportionate high rates of minority youth whose over representation continues to increase severely with each step away from civilized society and into the system. Youth and young adults of color make up nearly 20% of Virginia’s youth population, while accounting for more than 50 percent of all intakes, and more than 70 percent of DJJ direct care admissions.

Concurrently, we can note that racial and ethnic disparities effect citizens of our region and this can be used to raise concern and questions about the fairness of our Department of Juvenile Justice System and whether all people are receiving equal treatment under the law.

Even in the stage of prevention, these questions and concerns should be addressed because education and awareness are key to decrease the incline of the crisis of racial and ethnic disparities in systems and communities. These issues are all over our cities, counties, states, and nation.

In Virginia, the Department of Education’s Discipline, Crime and Violence report from 2014-2015 showed that while black students represented 23 percent of Virginia’s total student enrollment, they accounted for 53 percent of short-term suspensions, 60 percent of long-term suspensions, and 52 percent of expulsions.

This is a problem that is easier to identify than to solve, and one that defies easy solutions. The contributing factors are many, the issues challenging, and the people and agencies that must work together to take it on are numerous.

For these matters Norfolk Prevention Coalition intends to conduct longitudinal studies. A longitudinal study is a observational study that follows the same subjects repeatedly over a period of time, in some cases from birth to death.

The use of longitudinal data in informs and shapes best practices relating to child development and social mobility (how a child moves through society).

Longitudinal data enables us to:

• Track children’s development throughout childhood and teenage years, to adulthood and beyond – including influences, aspirations and cognitive outcomes

• Study the links between family background, educational achievements and later outcomes

• Understand social mobility and the inter-generational transmission of advantage and disadvantage

• Identify drivers of socio-economic inequality and effective interventions to increase social mobility.

Moreover, we are requesting that community stakeholders join Norfolk Prevention Coalition during the “Membership Drive,” as we are recruiting members to assist with updating the community needs assessment used to address Norfolk’s public health crisis from 2015-2021.

Sign up now:

Adult Survey Membership

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/7HYJ8R6

Youth Membership

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RVR3752

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